In Memoriam: Rose Wolfe

Former chancellor remembered for her wit and warmth

Outside the Box

U of T alumna Margaret Russocki was a leading modernist architect in Toronto — and one of the few women in her field

Battling a Health Emergency

Heather Johnston helps combat AIDS in Malawi as president of Dignitas

The Air Up There

Tarek Ibrahim wants to make personal flying machines a reality

She Walks in Beauty

Astronomer Helen Sawyer Hogg not only researched the stars, but explained them in a heavenly manner to students and the public

Is Health a Human Right?

Recent cases in international law suggest the idea is gaining momentum

Photo courtesy U of T Scarborough

Where Do You Go, My Lovelies?

Fred and Norah Urquhart’s lifelong quest for the hidden kingdom of the Monarch butterfly

Singing It for Themselves

Erin Bardua and Maureen Batt founded an opera company that’s not highbrow or high-cost, but simply fun

Championing Canadian Art

From the moment she arrived in Canada, Katerina Atanassova was drawn to the Group of Seven

Duddy and Me

Ted Kotcheff made almost 20 movies during his career – but it was a pair of small films that really got critics to take notice

Cry the Beloved Country

A network of Syrian expats is bringing youth abroad to study in safety

Photo by Peter Andrew

Digging Deep

How many new dinosaur species can one person help find? Professor David Evans is up to eight

Sad Songs (Say So Much)

Research finds that pop music is getting more melancholy – a sign, perhaps, of the times?

Photo by HarperCollins Publishers

Internet Explorer

Author Andrew Blum follows the wires behind the Web

Photo courtesy of U of T Archives

Frye’s Anatomy

To his English students, Northrop Frye, the brilliant literary critic, was an intellectual god and a master lecturer. One-on-one, though, he could be difficult to read

Celebrating Northrop

Moncton’s annual Frye Festival attracts thousands, including many distinguished authors

Computer Whiz

Computer Whiz

Dag Spicer talks tech at his Silicon Valley museum

The 2,000-Year Info Revolution

The 2,000-Year Info Revolution

“Computers” have assisted humans through history

Marshall’s Laws

Fifty years after the publication of his most famous works, we’re still making sense of all Marshall McLuhan had to say

Global Nerve Centre

$1.8-million campaign will revitalize U of T’s culture and technology program and build on McLuhan’s legacy

Photo Courtesy of McClelland & Stewart

In the Name of the Daughter

In her literary debut, lawyer Emma Ruby-Sachs wonders about the personal costs of activism

Photo by Ivan Otis

Tales from a Troubadour

Justin Rutledge talks about the art of writing lyrics, working with Michael Ondaatje and surviving cat attacks

Photo by David Leyes

The Ties That Bind

Joy Fielding explores a tangled mother-daughter relationship in her new book, Now You See Her

Photo: City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 79

The Aviator

Brave, dashing and touched by the spirit of adventure, Douglas McCurdy became the first person to fly an airplane out of sight of land

Like a Bird

A U of T engineering student has become the first ever to fly a human-powered “ornithopter”

Photo Courtesy of Ian Jackson

The World According to Walt

Wingfield Lost and Found hits Toronto

Courtesy of Bishari Films 2010

Crimes Against Women

Shelley Saywell explores so-called “honour killings” in her new film

Image Courtesy of Thomas Allen Publishers

Learning to Let Go

In her new book, author Marni Jackson searches for the right level of involvement in her adult son’s life

The Social Historian

Professor Natalie Zemon Davis gives new life to history’s outsiders

The Lost Left

Westerners who reject mainstream culture as “inauthentic” may, in fact, be status seekers, says Andrew Potter

Mealtime Patriotism

Writer Sarah Elton argues in favour of local eating

Photo by Wayne Hiebert/Ottawa Citizen, reprinted by permission

Poet in Motion

Dionne Brand releases her new collection, Ossuaries, while serving as Toronto’s poet laureate

Courtesy of Random House Canada

Why Your World Is About to Get a Whole Lot Smaller

Economist Jeff Rubin’s new book contemplates life after the Oil Age

Death Becomes Him

Novelist Andrew Pyper goes in for the kill

Joan of Architecture

While everyone else was tearing down historical buildings and throwing up mega-developments, architect Joan Burt spoke up for preservation

Urban Legend

Celebrated American academic Richard Florida heads up the new Martin Prosperity Institute at U of T

Behind Enemy Lines

U of T grads John Kenneth Macalister and Frank Pickersgill trained as spies during the Second World War. An unlucky break brought their lives to a tragic end

Author: Alec Scott