Online Learning through U of T

U of T has offered nine MOOCs since September 2012

Iron Man

By fortifying two everyday foods, Prof. Levente Diosady aims to reduce malnutrition worldwide

A Better University

At the end of David Naylor’s term as president, the student experience is stronger, research and innovation are booming and the global impact of Toronto alumni is greater than ever

Building Boom

Since 2005, a total of 37 major building projects have been completed or are now underway

Boundless Mission

The university’s current fundraising campaign will create a legacy for tomorrow’s students, faculty and staff – and for Canada

A Great Cause

David Naylor talks about the past eight years and his plans for the future

Duddy and Me

Ted Kotcheff made almost 20 movies during his career – but it was a pair of small films that really got critics to take notice

Starting Up

They’re tech-savvy, creative and driven. Meet five young grads who have created their own unique careers

Dream Job

Cybill Lui worked for years on Wall Street, then followed her heart into the high-risk world of film production

Taking on Goliath

A Toronto startup is using technology to reinvent how homes are bought and sold

Backpacking with a Purpose

David Berkal wants to change the way people think about tourism

Beauty in Numbers

Nadia Amoroso helps clients interpret complex data quickly and present it memorably

Uncovering Fraud

Computer science grad Stephen Piron is helping banks stay on the right side of regulators

Taking Care

Mary Jo Haddad came to Sick Kids to look after ill children. As CEO, she helped nurse the whole hospital back to good health

Corduroy

Winner of the 2013 U of T Magazine Short Story Contest

A Missing Child

Winner and Readers’ Choice favourite in the 2013 U of T Magazine Poetry Contest

Sparks of Brilliance

Meet U of T’s next generation of scientists, thinkers and inventors

Starving Cancer Cells

Many scientists work for years to find a cure for a single type of cancer – Patrick Gunning has his sights set on four

Literary Songbird

Katherine Larson infuses her study of English with a passion for music to find new meaning in literature

Speed of Light

Joyce Poon is developing optical devices that could make computers vastly more powerful and a whole lot faster

Goodbye to Plastic?

Emma Master imagines a world with much less garbage, thanks to new organic materials she’s researching

The Art of Activism

Naisargi Dave investigates what inspires someone to take up a cause

Asia Rising

As global power shifts to Asia, Canada’s success will depend on seeing more than just business opportunities in the region, says Joseph Wong

Aging Well

Samir Sinha wants to help keep older Canadians healthy and independent for longer. As the population ages, the viability of our health-care system depends on it

Go Argonautes!

Julie Claycomb is researching a group of proteins that may yield new treatments for a variety of genetic and viral diseases

Markets Without Borders?

Deborah Cowen investigates what happens when governments sacrifice the rights of their citizens to protect the flow of goods across national lines

The Importance of Being Intuitive

Chen-Bo Zhong is interested in how intuition affects moral decisions – and prevents us from behaving unethically

The New Regent Park

A university community helps a neighbourhood transform

Towers of Song

A U of T music grad runs an innovative program to bring affordable music lessons to Regent Park youth

Pathways’ Progress

A homework support program involving OISE students has more than doubled high school graduation rates in Regent Park

Apocalypse How?

The world will end, just probably not this year, University of Toronto experts say

End Times

“End-of-the-world” panics go back hundreds of years

Welcome to the “Apopalypse”

The fascination with end times is everywhere in pop culture – including that Britney Spears song on your iPod

Evil Robots

Could the machines we create one day destroy us?

Deadly Pandemics through History

It seems that every era has its scourge

Zombies vs. Vampires

What’s scarier, a zombie or vampire apocalypse?

How Stars Die

Some blow out, others just fade away

The Technopreneurs

Science students get a month-long crash course in turning an idea into a viable business at U of T’s “Techno” program

Canada’s Next Tech Success?

Three Techno participants share the vision for their companies

Enter Stage Left

Jeremy Hutton nudges Hart House Theatre in a new direction

Star Power

Hart House’s notable theatre, film and television personalities

Photo by Chris Thomaidis

Frugal Thinking

How do you bring basic sanitation to two billion people in low-income countries? Inventing a toilet that works for pennies a day is a start

Photo by Chris Thomaidis

Frugal Fortification

A U of T nutritional scientist has developed a low-cost product to fight vitamin and mineral deficiency in developing countries

Photo by Brent Lewin

The Sage of Bay Street

David Rosenberg warned of a financial crisis few others saw coming. So why, amid ongoing global turmoil, is Bay Street’s most noted pessimist ready to change his tune?

Illustration by Gavin Potenzawidth

A Shift in Perception

Discoveries in brain science are prompting new theories about how our senses work – and how they affect our understanding of the world

koetsy18/stock.xchng

Selling to the Senses

Companies appeal to hearing, taste and sight to affect consumer perception

Photo by Chris Thomaidis

Escaping Gridlock

What’s the solution to Toronto’s traffic problems?

Illustration by Pui Yan Fong

Perfect Harmony

A new U of T research centre will investigate the curative power of music

How Music Gets Inside

At its simplest, music is just sound. And sound is just vibration. So how does it get inside us, and influence us?

Courtesy of Doug Richards/Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education

Revolutionary Road

Forty years ago, an intrepid group of professors and students sparked progress for women across U of T

Feminist Revolution at U of T

Milestones over more than a century

Seeing Disease

Researchers are developing better ways to detect serious illnesses before they become life-threatening – and while they’re still treatable

Photo courtesy of U of T Archives

Frye’s Anatomy

To his English students, Northrop Frye, the brilliant literary critic, was an intellectual god and a master lecturer. One-on-one, though, he could be difficult to read

Illustration by Simon Pemberton

Planet Hunters

With the discovery of hundreds of worlds around other stars, will we find that Earth is not alone in bearing life?

Saving Lives, One Death at a Time

Saving Lives, One Death at a Time

What one of the world’s largest mortality studies is teaching us about public health

Technologies for Aging Gracefully

Technologies for Aging Gracefully

A University of Toronto lab is harnessing computers to make life better as we age

Photo by Cindy Blazevic

A World of Possibilities

University of Toronto students are putting their knowledge to work in the global village

Marshall’s Laws

Fifty years after the publication of his most famous works, we’re still making sense of all Marshall McLuhan had to say

Mind Games

Doctors have been trying for decades to classify mental illnesses. So why do precise definitions still elude us?

Timing is Everything

Modern life is 24-7, but there may be negative consequences to defying our body’s internal clock

Category: Feature