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Singers and dancers from the Etobicoke School of the Arts entertain young patients at the Hospital for Sick Children with a lively and colourful rendition of “Oh the Thinks You Can Think”
Photo by Tom Cardoso

Seuss Power!

Student group recruits talented young musicians to perform for children in hospitals

Singers and dancers from the Etobicoke School of the Arts entertain young patients at the Hospital for Sick Children with a lively and colourful rendition of “Oh the Thinks You Can Think” from Seussical the Musical. (Adam McLaughlin plays Horton the Elephant.) About 50 kids gathered with their parents and hospital workers in the Sick Kids lobby recently and watched the troupe perform Broadway tunes and pop songs.

The show was arranged by Kids Helping Sick Kids through Song, a U of T group that fourth-year pathobiology student Elliott Borinsky founded last year to recruit talented young musicians and dancers to perform for sick children in various venues. The hospital has asked Borinsky to produce quarterly performances.

“As a performer, I realized the power of song to inspire hope,” says Borinsky, who attended the Etobicoke School of the Arts himself and has sung with the Children’s Opera Chorus and the Toronto Mendelssohn Youth Choir.

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