Summer 2009
Dr. Andrew Pinto

“Life outside the classroom is vital to one’s education”


Dr. Andrew Pinto (MD 2006)

Dr. Andrew Pinto (MD 2006)

Fave U of T moment Working with fellow students on social justice issues, such as preventing the U.S. military from recruiting Canadian researchers on campus.  We were successful in that instance, and the discussion about research funding got me involved in peace activism and medical ethics.

Since graduation After med school, I trained in family medicine at St. Michael’s Hospital, mostly working with the urban poor. I also worked briefly in rural Ontario and in First Nations communities. Currently, I am completing my master’s at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine as part of my training in community medicine.

A meaningful event As a member of Physicians for Global Survival, I conduct research in different countries into injuries caused by gun violence. I will never forget a 16-year-old girl in eastern Uganda who was injured by a bullet that passed through her and killed her husband, or a teenager in El Salvador who was paralyzed by a stray bullet. This work brings me in contact with people who suffer as a direct result of the arms trade.

Your dream? To work toward real solidarity with the people most oppressed in this world, and to attempt to stop being part of their oppression.

Are you doing now what you thought you’d be doing when you attended U of T? Yes, although I had never imagined I would be privileged to work and study with so many incredible people.

What has winning the Gordon Cressy Award meant to you? Life outside the classroom is vital to one’s education. I’m happy that U of T recognizes students for their initiative and for contributing to the community, on and off campus.


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