U of T’s 190th Birthday Quiz

Test your knowledge of all things U of T in honour of the university’s 190th anniversary on March 15!

Photo of Harold Johns

This “Bomber” Actually Saved Countless Lives

U of T alumnus Harold Johns pioneered a new kind of cancer treatment dubbed the “cobalt bomb”

Seeking Refuge from Nazi Persecution, the MS St. Louis Was Turned Away at Every Port

U of T community members sought to help Jewish refugees during the Second World War

Photo courtesy Master of Science in Biomedical Communications program, U of T Mississauga

Anatomy of an Illustrator

Artist Maria Torrence Wishart founded U of T’s 90-year-old medical illustration department, now a thriving master’s program

U of T’s World Wide Web

The university’s scholars are collaborating with partners in every region of the globe to answer questions that challenge us all

U of T’s World Wide Web: Online Exclusives

Read four stories that don’t appear in our print issue about students and scholars who are working with colleagues around the world

The Spy Among Us

U of T prof Pat Bayly headed up North America’s first spy school and developed an “unbreakable” cipher machine during the Second World War

U of T Birthday Quiz

U of T celebrates its 188th anniversary on Sunday, March 15. Here’s a chance to test your knowledge of all things U of T!

Doctor of Courage

Rejected by American universities, Alexander T. Augusta completed his medical degree at Trinity Medical College then used his skills to fight for civil rights in his homeland

Changed by War

A century ago, the First World War changed Canadian society profoundly, and transformed the University of Toronto no less

Changed by War: Nothing Lacking but the Roar of Battle

While nothing could prepare recruits for the grim realities of trench warfare, the University of Toronto did what it could to equip its student soldiers for what was coming

Changed by War: Letter from the Front

The day after his right forearm was “slightly wounded,” Captain Frederick Banting used his uninjured left hand to pen a wobbly note home

Changed by War: An Artist at War

Wounded soldiers drolly referred to “the beauty parlour,” a humorous defense against the terrible possibility of ever being sent to a hospital’s plastic surgery department

Changed by War: Farmerettes Help at Home

In 1917 and 1918 hundreds of U of T “farmerettes” signed up for national service on Ontario farms

Changed by War: Forgotten Warriors – Animals at War

Millions of animals served on both sides of the conflict. Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae developed close bonds with his horse Bonfire and dogs Bonneau and Mike

Changed by War: Waging War on Infection

In 1914, 32 per cent of the British wounded contracted tetanus. The British and Allied command looked to the University of Toronto for help

Changed by War: Objects of Salvation

In the trenches the only criteria for alarm devices were that they be loud and distinctive – but as a bonus, rattles didn’t require use of the lungs

Author: Alice Taylor