Contributors

Neighbourhood of streets and houses on an electronic circuit board

Preventing Disease through AI

Laura Rosella is using machine learning to suggest ways to reduce diabetes rates – and save millions in potential health-care costs

U of T professor Nav Persaud

The High Price of Pills

More than two million Canadians don’t take their full dose of medications because of the cost. How can they be helped?

From left: Jeff Reading, Howard Hu, Lee Vernich and Earl Nowgesic have all been involved with U of T’s cancer study in the First Nation community at Northwest Angle 33.

A Community Grapples with Cancer

Researchers at the Waakebiness-Bryce Institute for Indigenous Health have teamed up with a First Nation in northwestern Ontario to solve a generation-old medical mystery

Illustration of a laptop with gene sequencing on the screen.

The Gene Editors

U of T scientists are using a powerful new technology to alter DNA and possibly cure disease

How CRISPR works.

How CRISPR Works

Proteins and RNA all play a part in this age-old defense against invading viruses

Illustration of a blue shirt with white clouds, a green striped tie, and a joint being smoked

High Time?

When it comes to legalizing marijuana, drug and public health experts caution that “the devil is in the details”

Illustration of two surgeons operating within a box being opened

A Cut Above

A “black box” for the operating room is leading to improved training for physicians and better knowledge of surgical errors

Since becoming CEO of Canada Goose in 2001 at the age of 27, Dani Reiss (BA 1997 Woodsworth) has built the company into one of Canada’s most recognized brands. Photo: Daniel Ehrenworth

The Reluctant CEO

Arts grad Dani Reiss wanted to become a writer, then realized there was more than one way to tell a story

Illustration of a woman in a force field protecting from oncoming blackness.

Superbugs

Drug-resistant infections are a man-made problem. Is it one we can solve?

Illustration of C Difficile.

The Superbug Hitlist

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), these are considered the most urgent or serious threats

Photo of a cup of orange lique that appears to be sinking into the table.

Iron Man

By fortifying two everyday foods, Prof. Levente Diosady aims to reduce malnutrition worldwide

Illustration of medical professionals attempting to capture disease in a book.

When Germs Get Tougher

An Internet-based surveillance system gives physicians the ability to track dangerous new strains of tuberculosis in real time

Illustration of people under a tree in the light with an individual who is sad directly under the tree in opposite colours.

Peace of Mind

A U of T project aims to bring better mental health to a country where most illnesses go untreated

Tissue Printer developed at U of T

Second Skin

Machine-made skin being developed at U of T may be safer, faster and cheaper than traditional grafts

Illustration of a computer screen window over a medical illustration of a body.

Seeing Disease

Researchers are developing better ways to detect serious illnesses before they become life-threatening – and while they’re still treatable

Photo: Keith Beaty/Getstock.com

Ode to Joy

Master’s student Eric Wan helped develop software that allows anyone, including people with severe physical disabilities, to make music

Illustration of a figure of a child with square shapes around them.

Understanding Autism

Scientist Stephen Scherer aims to uncover the genetic causes of an incurable neural disorder

The ABCs of Autism

Contrary to stereotypes, most autistic children don’t bang their heads, and fewer than one per cent are brilliant savants

Illustration of adults (parents) wearing labcoats and holding infants.

Parents – At Last!

Reproductive science has made huge strides over the past 30 years, bringing hope to millions of infertile couples. But some formidable barriers remain

The Age Barrier

Even with the best medical technology, most women over 40 have little chance of getting pregnant

Microscopic illustration of stem cells

The Big Promise of a Tiny Cell

Stem cell medicine may soon generate new treatments for any condition where cells have been damaged, such as heart disease, diabetes – even blindness

Illustration of people sleeping in test tubes

The Science of Sleep

Research is pointing to new treatments for the millions of North Americans who suffer from sleep disorders.

Healing the Heart

Specially engineered tissue patches could help heart attack patients fully recover

Unbroken Dreams

After years of incremental progress, spinal cord repair is edging closer to reality